Modelling Ontario Butterfly Populations using Citizen Science

Author Name: Emily Alvarez

Data Source: Toronto Entomologists Association (TEA), Statistics Canada

Project Link:

https://public.tableau.com/profile/emily6079#!/vizhome/ModellingOntarioButterflyPopulationsusingCitizenScience/Butterfly_Dashboard?publish=yes

Background:

Over the summer, I spotted multiple butterflies and caterpillars in my garden and became curious about what species may be present in my area and how that might change over time. Originally, I wanted to look at pollinators in general and their populations in Canada, but the data was not available for this. I reached out to the Toronto Entomologists Association (TEA) and fortunately, there was an abundant amount of butterfly population data gathered for the Ontario Butterfly Atlas. This atlas data comes from eButterfly records, iNaturalist records and BAMONA records, as well as records submitted by the public directly to TEA, therefore this data is collected by anyone who wants to submit observations. The organization had an interactive web-map (Figure 1), but this data still had more potential to be designed in a way that can engage both butterfly enthusiasts and the general public.

Figure 1: Ontario Butterfly Atlas Interactive Web Map

Technology

I chose Tableau as the platform to model this data on because it works efficiently with complex databases and large datasets. It is easy to sort and filter the data as well as perform operations (SUM, COUNT) as this was needed for some components of the dashboard. I have used Tableau in the past for simple data visualization but never for spatial data so I felt that using Tableau could be a learning experience as well as improving my skills on a software that I have used in the past.  

Data & Methods:

I consulted with a contact at TEA who provided me with context on the data such as how it is gathered, missing gaps, and the annual seasonal summary on the data. Based on this information and after reviewing the dataset, I felt that there were 3 main components I could model about butterfly species in Ontario. Their location, number of yearly observations and their flight periods for adult populations. Because there was so much data, I focused on 2019 for the locational data and flight periods. There were some inconsistencies with how some of the data was recorded, mostly for number of adults observed since this was not always recorded as a numeric value, therefore any rows that did not have a numeric value were omitted from the dataset.

I chose to model the location of the species by census division because these divisions are not too small in area but are also general enough that it is easy to find the user’s location if they reside in Ontario. This resulted in a spatial join between the observation’s coordinates and the provincial census divisions’ geometry which allowed for a calculation of total sum of adults observed per census division which could also be filtered by species (Figure 2).

Figure 2: Census Division Map of Adult Butterfly Species

I modelled flight periods by month of observation of adult species because this seemed like an efficient way for the user to find when species are in their flight periods (Figure 3). Some enthusiasts may prefer this data to be modelled by month-thirds instead, but I felt that because I wanted this dashboard to be for both butterfly enthusiasts and the general public, I thought modelling by month may be easier for the user to interpret. I decided to also show this by census division because the circle size helps indicate where observations are most popular and how that compares to other census divisions. The user also has a choice to sort by census division and only visualize the flight period for that particular census division.

Figure 3: Flight Period

I modelled yearly observations starting from 2010 because submitted observations began to increase during this time due to more accessibility to online services for submissions, although data exists from the 1800s (Figure 4). This data also could only be filtered by species and not census division because this dataset with all of the observations is too big for the spatial join and caused issues with data extraction that Tableau requires for workbooks to post online.  

Figure 4: Yearly Observations for all Census Divisions

Limitations and Future Work:

  • One of the biggest limitations to this dataset is the lack of observations in the northern regions compared to the southern. Because there is a lower population and less accessibility to a lot of areas, there are few submitted observations here, therefore the dataset does not capture the whole picture of Ontario.
  • Another limitation is that because this is citizen science-based data, there is some inconsistency with some data entry, as an example, the Adult populations were not always recorded numerically but sometimes with text or unclear values such as “a few, many, >100” which resulted in these observations not being modelled because they could not be properly quantified.
  • Another limitation is that the yearly observations cannot be sorted by census division. Because this contains such a large dataset, to conduct the spatial join with the census division polygons caused issues with data extraction and publishing the workbook. Therefore, this component can only be sorted by species.
  • The last biggest limitation to the dashboard is the way flight periods are modelled. Butterfly enthusiasts may prefer to look at flight periods within a smaller scale than months and prefer month-thirds. A future addition to this dashboard could include a toggle that allows you to switch between looking at flight period by month or month-thirds instead.

Geovisualization of the York Region 2018 Business Directory


(Established Businesses across Region of York from 1806 through 2018)

Project Weblink (ArcGIS Online): Click here or direct weblink at https://ryerson.maps.arcgis.com/apps/opsdashboard/index.html#/82473f5563f8443ca52048c040f84ac1

Geovisualization Project @RyersonGeo
SA8905- Cartography and Geovisualization, Fall 2020
Author: Sridhar Lam

Introduction:

York Region, Ontario as identified in Figure 1, with over one million people from a variety of cultural backgrounds is across 1,776 square kilometres stretching from Steeles Avenue in the south to Lake Simcoe and the Holland Marsh in the north. By 2031, projections indicate 1.5 million residents, 780,000 jobs, and 510,000 households. Over time, York Region attracted a broad spectrum of business activity and over 30,000 businesses.

Fig.1: Region of York showing context within Ontario, Greater Toronto Area (GTA) and its nine Municipalities.
(Image-Sources: https://www.fin.gov.on.ca/en/economy/demographics/projections/ , https://peelarchivesblog.com/about-peel/ and https://www.forestsontario.ca/en/program/emerald-ash-borer-advisory-services-program)

Objective:

To create a geovisualization dashboard for the public to navigate, locate and compare established Businesses across the nine Municipalities within the Region of York.

The dashboard is intended to help Economic Development market research divisions sort and visualize businesses’ nature, year of establishment (1806 through 2018), and identify clusters (hot-spots) at various scales.

Data-Sources & References:

  1. Open-Data York Region
  2. York Region Official Plan 2010

Methodology:

First, the Business Directory updated as of 2018, and the municipal boundaries layer files, which are made available at the Open-Data Source of York Region, are downloaded. As shown in Figure 2, the raw data is analyzed to identify the Municipal data based on the address / municipal location distribution. It is identified that the City of Markham and the City of Vaughan have a major share.

Fig.2: The number of businesses and the percentage of share within the nine Municipalities of the York Region.

The raw-data is further analyzed, as shown in Figure 3, to identify the major business categories, and the chart below presents the top categories within the dataset.

Fig.3: Major Business Categories identified within the dataset.

Further, the raw data is analyzed, as shown in figure 4, to identify the businesses by the year of establishment, and identifies that most of the businesses within the dataset were established after the 1990s.

Fig 4: Business Establishment Years identified within the dataset.

The Business addressed data is checked for consistency, and Geocodio service is used to geocode the address list for all the business location addresses. The resulting dataset is imported into ArcGIS Map, as shown in figure 5, along with the municipal boundaries layers and checked for inconsistent data before being uploaded onto ArcGIS Online as hosted layers.

Fig.5: Business Locations identified after geocoding of the addresses across the York Region.

Once hosted on ArcGIS Online, a new dashboard titled: ‘Geovisualization of the York Region 2018 Business Directory’ is created. To the dashboard, the components are tested for visual hierarchy, and careful selection is made to use the following components to display the data:

  1. Dashboard Title
  2. Navigation (as shown in figure 6, is placed on the left of the interface, which provides information and user-control to navigate)
  3. Pull-Down/ Slider Lists for the user to select and sort from the data
  4. Maps – One map to display the point data and the other to display cluster groups
  5. Serial Chart (List from the data)- To compare the selected data by the municipality
  6. Map Legend, and
  7. Embedded Content – A few images and videos to orient the context of the dashboard

The user is given a choice to select the data by:

Fig.6: User interface for the dashboard offering selection in dropdown and slider bar.

Thus a user of the dashboard can select or make choices using one or a combination of the following to display the results in on the right panes (Map, data-chart and cluster density map):

  1. Municipality: By each or all Municipalities within York Region
  2. Business Type: By each type or multiple selections
  3. Business Establishment Year Time-Range using the slider (the Year 1806 through 2018)

For the end-user of this dashboard, results are also provided based on business locations identified after geocoding the addresses across the York Region, comparative and quantifiable by each of the nine municipalities shown in Figure 7.

Fig.7: Data-Chart displayed once the dashboard user makes a selection.

By plotting the point locations on a map, and simultaneously showing the clusters within the selected range (Region/ by Municipality / by Business Type / Year of Establishment selections), Figure 8.

Fig.8: Point data map and cluster map indicate the exact geolocation as well as the cluster for the selection made by the user across the York Region at different scales.

Results:

Overall, the dashboard provides an effective geovisualization with a spatial context and location detail of the York Region’s 2018 businesses. The business type index with an option to select one/ multiple at a time and the timeline slider bar offers an end-user of the dashboard to drill down to the information they seek to obtain from this dashboard. The dashboard design offers a dark theme interface maintaining a visual hierarchy of the different map elements such as the map title, legend, colour scheme, colour combinations ensuring contrast and balance, font face selection and size, background and map contrast, choice of hues, saturation, emphasis etc. The maps also offer the end-user to change the background map base layers to see the data in the context of their choice. As shown in figure 9 of location data and quantifiable data at different scales, the dashboard interface offers visuals to display the 30,000+ businesses across the York Region.

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Fig.9: Geovisualization Dashboard to display the York Region 2018 Business Directory across the Nine Municipalities of the York Region.

The weblink to access the ArcGIS Online Dashboard where it is hosted is: https://ryerson.maps.arcgis.com/apps/opsdashboard/index.html#/82473f5563f8443ca52048c040f84ac1

(Please note an ArcGIS Online account is required)

Limitation:

The 2018 business data across York Region contains over 38,000 data points, and the index/ legend of the business types may look cluttered while a selection is made as well. The fixed left navigation panel width is definitely a technical limitation because the pull-down display cannot be made wider. However, the legend screen could be maximized to read all the business categories clearly. There may be errors, incomplete or missing data in the compilation of business addresses. This dashboard can be updated quickly but requires a little effort, whenever there is an update of the York Region business directory’s new release in the coming years.

Ontario Demographics Data Visualization

Introduction

The purpose of this project is to visualize any kind of data on a webmap. Using open source software, such as QGIS, solves one aspect of this problem. The other part of this problem is to answer this question:

How and what data can be visualized? Data can be stored in a variety of formats, and organized differently. The most important aspect of spatial data is the spatial information itself and so we need to figure out a way to display the data using textual descriptions, symbols, colours, etc. at the right location.

Methodology

In this visualization, I am using the census subdivisions (downloaded from Statstics Canada website) as the basic geographical unit, plus the 2016 census profile for the census subdivisions (also downloaded from Statistics Canada website). Once these data were downloaded, the next steps were to inspect the data and organize them in a fashion so that they could be easily visualized by the shapefiles. In order to facilitate this task, we can use any relational database management system, however, my preference was to use SQL Server 2017 express edition. Once the 2016 census profile has been imported into SQL Server, the “SQL Queries” [1] file can be run to organize the data into a relational table that can be exported, or copied directly from the result-set on management studio and pasted, into excel/csv; the sheet/file can now be opened in QGIS and joined to the shapefile of Ontario Census Subdivisions [2] using CSDUID as the common field between the two files.

Using the qgis2web plugin, all data and instructions are manually chosen on a number of tabs. You can choose the layers and groups you want to upload, and then customize the appearance and interactivity of the webmap based on available options. There is the option to use either Leaflet, or OpenLayers styles on QGIS version 3.8. You can Update preview and see what the outcome will look like. You can then Export the map and the plugin will convert all the data and instructions into json format. The most important file – index.html – is created on the directory you have specified.

index.html [1] is the file that can be used to visualize the map on the web browser, however, you need to first download all the files and folders from the source page [1]. This will put all the files on your (client) machine which makes it possible to open index.html on localhost. If the map files are uploaded on a web server, then the map can be viewed by the world wide web.

Webmap

The data being visualized belongs to the population demographics (different age groups). The map of Ontario’s census subdivisions is visualized as a transparent choropleth map of 2016 population density. Other pieces of demographics information are embedded within the pop-up for each of the census subdivisions. If you hover your cursor on each of the census subsivisions, it will be highlighted with a transparent yellow colour so you can see the basemap information on the basemap clearer. If you click on them, the pop-up will appear on the screen, and you can scroll through it.

There are other interactive utilities on the map such as controllers for zooming in and out, a (ruler) widget to make measurements, a (magnifying glass) widget to search the entire globe, a (binocular) widget to search only the layers uploaded on the map, and a (layers) widget to turn layers and basemaps on and off.

Limitations

There are some limitations that I encountered after I created this webmap. The first, and most important limitation, is the projection of the data on the map. The original shapefile was using the EPSG code of 3347 which uses the Canada Lambert Conic projection with NAD 1983 datum. The plugin converted data into the most common web projection format, WGS 1984, which is defined globally by Longitude and Latitude. Although WGS 1984 prevents the hassle of using projected coordinate systems by using one unified geographic projection for the entire globe, nevertheless, it distorts the shapes as we move farther away from the equator.

The second limitation was the fact that my transparent colours were not coded into the index.html file. The opacities are defined as 1. In order to control the level of opacities, the index.html file must be opened in a text editor, the opacities changed to the proper levels, ranging between 0 and 1, and lastly save the edits on the same index.html file.

The next limitation is the size of files that can be uploaded on github [3]. There is a limit of 100 MB on the files that can be uploaded to github repositories, and because the size of the shapefile for entire Canadian census subdivisions is over 100 MB, when converted to json, it could not be uploaded to the repository [1] with all the other files. However, it is possible to add to geojson formatted file (of census subdivisions) to the data directory of the repository on the localhost machine, and manually add its location with a pair of opening and closing script tags on the index.html file on the body tag. In my case, the script was:

<script src=”data/CensusSubdivisions_4.js“></script>

The name of the file should be introduced as the very beginning line of the geojson file as a variable:

var json_CensusSubdivisions_4 = {

And don’t forget that the last line should be a closing curly braces:

}

Now index.html is aware where to find the data for all of the Canadian census subdivisions.

What’s Next?

To conclude with the main goal of this project, which was stated in the introduction, we now have a framework to visualize any data we want. Which data we want to visualize should change our methodology becasuase the scripts can be adapted accordingly. What is more important is the way we want the data to be visualized on the webmap. This tutorial presented the basics of qgis2web plugin. Once the index.html file is generated, other javascript libraries can be added to this file, and depending on your level of comfort with javascript you can expand and go beyond the simple widgets and utilities on this webmap.

  [1]  https://github.com/Mahdy1989/GeoVisualization-Leaflet-Webmap/tree/master  

 [2] There is a simple way to limit the extent of the census subdivisions for the entire Canada, to the Ontario subset only: filter the shapefile by PRUID = '35' which is the code for Ontario.

[3]  https://help.github.com/en/github/managing-large-files/what-is-my-disk-quota 

Invasive Species in Ontario: An Animated-Interactive Map Using CARTO

By Samantha Perry
Geovis Project Assignment @RyersonGeo, SA8905, Fall 2018

My goal was to create an animated time-series map using CARTO to visualize the spread of invasive species across Ontario. In Ontario there are dozens of invasive species posing a threat to the health of our lakes, rivers, and forests. These intruding species can spread quickly due to the absence of natural predators, often damaging native species and ecosystems, and resulting in negative effects on the economy and human health. Mapping the spread of these invasive species is beneficial for showing the extent of the affected areas which can potentially be used for research and remediation purposes, as well as awareness for the ongoing issue. For this project, five of the most problematic or wide-spread invasive species were included in an animated-interactive map to show their spatial and temporal distribution.

The final animated-interactive map can be found at: https://perrys14.carto.com/builder/7785166c-d0cf-41ac-8441-602f224b1ae8/embed

Data

  1. The first dataset used was collected from the Ontario Ministry of Natural Resources and Forestry and contained information on invasive species observed in the province from 1982 to 2012. The data was provided as a shapefile, with polygons representing the affected areas.
  2. The second dataset was downloaded from the Early Detection & Distribution Mapping System (EDDMapS) Ontario website. The dataset included information about invasive species identified between 2010 and 2018. I obtained this dataset to supplement the Ontario Ministry dataset in order to provide a more up-to-date distribution of the species.

Software
CARTO is a location-intelligence based website that offers easy to use mapping and analysis software, allowing you to create visually appealing maps and discover key insights from location data. Using CARTO, I was able to create an animated-interactive map displaying the invasive species data. CARTO’s Time-Series Widget can be used to display large numbers of points over time. This feature requires a map layer containing point geometries with a timestamp (date), which is included in the data collected for the invasive species.

CARTO also offers an interactive feature to their maps, allowing users control some aspects of how they want to view the data. The Time-Series Widget includes animation controls such as play, stop, and pause to view a selected range of time. In addition, a Layer Selector can be added to the map so the user is able to select which layer(s) they wish to view.

Limitations
In order to create the map, I created a free student account with CARTO. Limitations associated with a free student account include a limit on the amount of data that can be stored, as well as a maximum of 8 layers per map. This limits the amount of invasive species that can be mapped.

Additionally, only one Time-Series Widget can be included per map, meaning that I could not include a time-series animation for each species individually, as I originally intended to. Instead, I had to create one time-series animation layer that included all five of the species. Because this layer included thousands of points, the map looks dark and cluttered when zoomed out to the full extent of the province (Figure 1). However, when zoomed in to specific areas of the province, the points do not overlap as much and the overall animation looks cleaner.

Another limitation to consider is that not all the species’ ranges start at the same time. As can be seen in Figure 1 below, the time slider on the map shows that there is a large increase in species observations around 2004. While it is possible that this could simply be due to an increase in observations around that time, it is likely because some of the species’ ranges begin at that time.

Figure 1. Layer showing all five invasive species’ ranges.

Tutorial

Step 1: Downloading and reviewing the data
The Ontario Ministry of Natural Resources and Forestry data was downloaded as a polygon shapefile using Scholars GeoPortal, while the EDDMapS Ontario dataset was downloaded as a CSV file from their website.

Step 2: Selection of species to map
Since the datasets included dozens of different invasive species in the datasets, it was necessary to select a smaller number of species to map. Determining which species to include involved some brief research on the topic, identifying which species are most prevalent and problematic in the province. The five species selected were the Eurasian Water-Milfoil, Purple Loosestrife, Round Goby, Spiny Water Flea, and Zebra Mussel.

Step 3: Preparing the data for upload to CARTO
Since the time-series animation in CARTO is only available for point data, I had to convert the Ontario Ministry polygon data to points. To do this I used ArcMap’s “Feature to Point” tool which created a new point layer from the polygon centroids. I then used the “Add XY Coordinates” tool to get the latitude and longitude of each point. Finally, I used the “Table to Excel” conversion tool to export the layer’s attribute table as an excel file. This provided me with a table with all invasive species point data collected by the Ontario Ministry that could be uploaded to CARTO.

Next, I created a table that included the information for the five selected species from both sources. I selected only the necessary columns to include in the new table, including; Species Name, Observation Date, Year, Latitude, Longitude, and Observation Source. This combined table was then saved as an excel file to be uploaded to CARTO.

Finally, I created 5 additional tables for each of the species separately. These were later used to create map layers that show each species’ individual distribution.

Step 4: Uploading the datasets to CARTO
After creating a free student account with CARTO, I uploaded the six datasets as excel files. Once uploaded, I had to change the “Observation Date” column from a “string” to “date” data type for each dataset. A “date” data type is required for the time-series animation to run.

Step 5: Geocoding datasets
Each dataset added to the map as a layer had to be geocoded. Using the latitude and longitude columns previously added to the Excel file, I geocoded each of the five species’ layers.

Step 6: Create time-series widget to display temporal distribution of all species
After creating a blank map, I added the Excel file that included all the invasive species data as a layer. I then added a Time-Series Widget to allow for the temporal animation. I then selected Observation Date as the column to be displayed, meaning that the point data will be organized by observation date. I chose to organize the buckets, or groupings, for the corresponding time-slider by year.

Since “cumulative” was not an option for the Time-Series layer, I had to use CARTCSS to edit the code for the aggregation style. Changing the style from “linear” to “cumulative” allowed the points to remain on the screen for the duration of the animation, letting the user see the entire species’ range in the province. The updated CSS code can be seen in the screenshots below.

Step 7: Creating five additional layers for each species’ range
Since I could only add one Time-Series Widget per map, and the layer with the animation looks cluttered at some extents, I decided to create five additional layers that show each of the species’ individual observation data and range.

Step 8: Customizing layer styles
After adding all of the layers, a colour scheme was selected where each of the species’ was represented by a different colour to clearly differentiate between them. Colours that are generally associated with the species were selected. For example, the colour purple was selected to represent Purple Loosestrife, which is a purple flowering plant. The “multiply” style option was selected, meaning that areas with more or overlapping occurrences of invasive species are a darker shade of the selected colour.

A layer selector was included in the legend so that users can turn layers on or off. This allows them to clearly see one species’ distribution at a time.

Step 9: Publish map
Once all of the layers were configured correctly, the map was published so it could be seen by the public.

Using LEGO to create a physical 3D elevation model of Ontario

by: Adam Anthony | Geovis Project Assignment @RyersonGeo, SA8905, Fall 2018

Using LEGO blocks to visualize the landscape elevation throughout the province of Ontario was an the objective of this project and the steps I took to execute this project will be outlined below.

I first sourced the elevation data from Scholar’s GeoPortal and used the north and south PDEM files for Ontario as the foundation for the elevation model. Using ArcGIS I added the north and south PDEM layers and merged the two files using Mosaic To New Raster tool. This produced a merged PDEM.

Next, the merged PDEM needed to be resampled, to increase the pixels size so that it would align with the size of a 1×1 LEGO block. Using the Resample tool, I resampled the pixel size from 30x30m to 30,000×30,000m resolution. This resolution was influenced by a number of factors:

  1. maintaining the integrity of the elevation levels (699m was the highest peak at 30x30m, but it reduced to 596m when resampled to 30kx30k)
  2. scale of physical model as it relates to size and cost of the LEGO blocks

Below is the resampled layer to 30k resolution and clipped to a raster tiff of Ontario (also at same resolution)

In the Properties dialiogue box I converted the Stretched symbology to Classificled symbology which would allow me to isolate specific elevation interval classes. I seleccted seven classes based on the following criteria:

  1. Wanted to isolate the high and low values
  2. Using intervals of 75m depicted the more visually appealling variation in elevation and did so most effectively. It allowed for a <75m and a >450m class
  3. No more than seven classes because of LEGO colour options and available stock
  4. Equal interval of 75m increments

Colour selection at this stage was preliminary and a divergent scheme from green to dark burgundy seemed to be most aesthetically pleasing.

To isolate each elevation layer to determine the number of pixels (i.e. LEGO blocks) each layer requires the raster layer had to be converted to a vector layer.

Using Raster Calculator and the Int Tool, I converted the current raster from a float to an integer raster layer which is needed to be done to convert raster to polygon. This converted each cell value of the raster to an integer.

This new raster file was then converted to a polygon layer using the Raster to Polygon tool, creating this output.

Activating the raster layer from a previous step, I was able to then manually select each pixel for each respective layer to determine the number of pixels (ie LEGO pieces) that comprised the layer.

Each pixel was selected using the Selection tool and then onces all pixels for the appropriate layer were selected, the Create Layer from Selected Features was used to create an individual layer for each elevation level.

This process was repeated 7 times, producing 7 layers of elevation. Each layer’s Attribute Table was then used to identify the total number of pixels present in the layer and then was used to determine the number of LEGO pieces needed for that layer, where 1 pixel = 1 single-block LEGO piece.

These individual layers will also be used during the build, as a guideline for the distribution and placement of each LEGO piece.

Each colour class is an individual layer. Colours are still preliminary and the number of LEGO pieces per layer is as follows:

  • <75m: 1089 pcs
  • 75-150m: 987 pcs
  • 150-225m: 809 pcs
  • 225-300m: 657 pcs
  • 300-375m: 455 pcs
  • 375-450m: 221 pcs
  • >450m: 51 pcs

Using BrickLink, I was able to purchase 1×1 LEGO bricks for each layer. Factors that influenced the colour selection for each layer are as follows:

  • Quantity of colour available
  • Price of individual bricks
  • Location of supplier (North American)

The resulting colour scheme selected is a divergent scheme, as follows:

  • <75m: dark green
  • 75-150m: medium grey
  • 150-225m: light green
  • 225-300m: tan
  • 300-375m: light lavender
  • 375-450m: medium lavender
  • >450m: dark purple

Here is the final product.

Here is a time lapse video of the LEGO build:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RP6PxkPlK1w&feature=youtu.be

HexBinning Ontario

By Andrew Thompson – Geovis course project, SA8905 (Dr. Rinner)

The power of data visualization is becoming increasingly more robust and intricate in nature. The demand to deliver a variety of complex information has lead to the development of highly responsive visual platforms. Libraries such as d3 are providing increased flexibility to work along multiple web technology stacks (HTML, CSS, SVG) allowing for nearly unlimited customization and capacity to handle large datatypes.

hexbin

In this development, a combination of d3 and Leaflet is used to provide a data-driven visualization within an easy to use mapping engine framework; made possible through the developments of Asymmetrik.  This collection of plugins, has allowed the creation of dynamic hexbin-based heatmaps and dynamically update/visualize transitions.

The web mapping application is avaiable at: HexBinning Ontario

Discussion of data & techniques follows below…

Continue reading HexBinning Ontario